Hi, I’m David Sorensen

I was born to Deaf parents in 1950.  I recently retired as a therapist and marketer at a deaf treatment center.  I see where deaf culture is now and I feel it is important to see where it came from and how it evolved.  My book was a lifetime in the making. As generations pass we lose some of the culture.  Like many cultures, the Deaf assimilate into the dominant culture.  In my book Between Two Worlds, I want to honor and preserve the culture I know. That is my story to tell.

 

THE TEXT ABOVE IS A TRANSCRIPTION OF THE VIDEO BELOW, WHICH IS IN AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE.

Let’s share our stories through my Between Two Worlds blog, this website, phone consultations (video phone or voice), Facebook, email or in-person presentations that I like to call fireside chats.

  • I recognize and respect the culture of the Deaf as it is now, knowing where it came from. I deliver my message from my past as a child of Deaf adults, family friends and my life work as a professional working in various capacities including therapist, counselor, administrator and business owner.
  • I deliver information on the historical changes from the 1950s to the present form my perspective. It is important that one knows the roots of change. 
  • I promote this historical information by interacting and involving the community interested in understanding the culture of the deaf.
  • I will follow-up by interacting on my blogs, website, phone, e-mail and Facebook.

Being a Coda within Deaf culture is distinguished by certain roles and characteristics.  As the firstborn, my responsibility at an early age was that of an interpreter for my parents, which later was deferred to my younger sister.  I was asked my opinion on certain adult decisions such as interpreting medical information.  As I became older, I was a confidant to other deaf adults throughout their decision-making processes.  Being born within a deaf family had its privileges, namely that I was accepted into the inner circle as a trusted member of the Deaf community even though I was hearing.  However, there were a few limitations there too.  For example, sometimes I was not included, such as at a basketball tournament that permitted only deaf players.

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